Adhesive Metatarsal Pads #106L, 1/4″ Foam Rate Best for Comfort

Foam Metatarsal Pads are used to cushion painful forefoot problems. They help off-load weight away from your forefoot, reducing symptoms associated with metatarsalgia, forefoot calluses, Mortons’ neuroma, sesamoiditis and ball of foot pain.

Packaging:
100/Pkg.

In stock

$23.63

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Adhesive Metatarsal Pads #106L, 1/4" Foam pad, metatarsal, cushion, ease foot pain, metatarsalAdhesive Metatarsal Pads #106L, 1/4″ Foam

Foam Metatarsal Pads are used to cushion painful forefoot problems. They help off-load weight away from your forefoot, reducing symptoms associated with metatarsalgia, forefoot calluses, Mortons’ neuroma, sesamoiditis and ball of foot pain.

Packaging:
100/Pkg.

Visit our Orthopedics and DME Supplies Category

Frequently Asked Questions

What do some studies say about metatarsal pads?

Felt padding has been used for a long time as a material for redistribution of foot pressure from various parts of the plantar surface of the foot, although there is little published research on the effect of felt on plantar pressure. According to Nube et al., the purpose of felt padding is to deflect pressure away from a particular area of the foot. They demonstrated that plantar pressure can be reduced in people with diabetes by the application of felt padding that is adhered to the foot. They argued that foot ulceration in diabetes is precipitated and perpetuated by many factors, chiefly peripheral neuropathy and biomechanical abnormalities but offloading of plantar pressure is a key element in the management of diabetes-related neuropathic foot ulcers.

The technique principally involves the adherence of felt or felted-foam to the sole of the foot, with an aperture cut into the material which corresponds with the ulcer location. Varying thicknesses of felt and methods of adhesion are used. Holmes and Timmerman used a pedobaragraph to assess the effect of a simple metatarsal pad on pressures transmitted to metatarsal heads by measuring dynamic pressure for 100 participants with and without metatarsal pads. They concluded that, when properly positioned, metatarsal pads can be an inexpensive and effective means of reducing plantar pressure.

Hayda et al. reported similar findings; they measured plantar pressures within the shoes of 10 volunteers with normal asymptomatic feet. Test conditions included large foam, large felt and small felt situated at three different positions. They concluded that metatarsal pads can effectively decrease plantar pressure in the shoe.

It can therefore be deduced from the literature that felt padding can play an important role in the management of patients’ foot health, but more research is required in this area as there is a variety of types and thicknesses of felt available.

Source: (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

When to Visit a Podiatrist?

If corns or calluses are causing pain and discomfort or inhibiting your daily life in any way, see a podiatrist. Also, people with diabetes, poor circulation, or other serious illnesses should have their feet checked.

How are corns and calluses diagnosed and treated?

The podiatrist will conduct a complete examination of your feet. X-rays may be taken; your podiatrist may also want to inspect your shoes and watch you walk. He or she will also take a complete medical history. Corns and calluses are diagnosed based on appearance and history.

If you have mild corns or calluses, your podiatrist may suggest changing your shoes and/or adding padding to your shoes. Larger corns and calluses are most effectively reduced (made smaller) with a surgical blade. A podiatrist can use the blade to carefully shave away the thickened, dead skin—right in the office. The procedure is painless because the skin is already dead. Additional treatments may be needed if the corn or callus recurs.

Cortisone injections into the foot or toe may be given if the corn or callus is causing significant pain. Surgery may be necessary in cases that do not respond to conservative treatment.

How are corns and calluses prevented?

Wear properly fitted shoes. If you have any deformities of the toe or foot, talk to your podiatrist to find out what shoes are best for you.

Gel pad inserts may decrease friction points and pressure. Your podiatrist can help you determine where pads might be useful.

Source: (apma.org)

Adhesive Metatarsal Pads #106L, 1/4" Foam pad, metatarsal, cushion, ease foot pain, metatarsal
Adhesive Metatarsal Pads #106L, 1/4″ Foam Rate Best for Comfort

In stock

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