DARCO SlimLine Cast Boot – #1 Best Seller – HCPCS L3260

The DARCO SlimLine™ Cast Boot can be adapted to fiberglass casts, bulky compression bandages and a variety of wound care applications, making it one of the most versatile cast shoes on the market.

Features and Benefits:
* Square Toe Design acts as a protective bumper and gives the patient more room to accommodate larger casts and bandages.
* Forefoot Closure can be adjusted to accommodate casts or bandages and can be switched between left/right closure.
* Higher Ankle Strap ads stability.
* Rocker Sole allows for a smooth roll throughout the gait pattern.

SIZE EXTRA SMALL (W: 3 – 51/2)
SIZE SMALL (W: 5 1/2 – 8, M: 5 – 61/2)
SIZE MEDIUM (W: 8 1/2 – 10, M: 6 – 8)
SIZE LARGE (W: 10 1/2 – 13, M: 8 1/2 – 11)
SIZE X-LARGE (W: 13 1/2+, M: 12 1/2 – 14)
Packaging:
1/Pkg.

Suggested HCPS Code – L3260
HCPCS Code Information

$12.50

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DARCO SlimLine Cast Boot cast boot, SlimLine, Darco, versatileThe DARCO SlimLine™ Cast Boot can be adapted to fiberglass casts, bulky compression bandages and a variety of wound care applications, making it one of the most versatile cast shoes on the market.

Features and Benefits:

  • Square Toe Design of the cast boot acts as a protective bumper and gives the patient more room to accommodate larger casts and bandages.
  • Forefoot Closure can be adjusted to accommodate casts or bandages and can be switched between left/right closure.
  • Higher Ankle Strap ads stability.
  • Rocker Sole allows for a smooth roll throughout the gait pattern.

SIZE EXTRA SMALL (W: 3 – 51/2)
SIZE SMALL (W: 5 1/2 – 8, M: 5 – 61/2)
SIZE MEDIUM (W: 8 1/2 – 10, M: 6 – 8)
SIZE LARGE (W: 10 1/2 – 13, M: 8 1/2 – 11)
SIZE X-LARGE (W: 13 1/2+, M: 12 1/2 – 14)

Packaging:
1/Pkg.

Visit our Orthopedics and DME Supplies Category

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some tips for getting around in a leg cast?

Walking with a cast boot.

Wearing a cast on any part of your leg can make getting around a challenge. In addition to the pain of a bone fracture, a cast can feel like a hindrance and irritation. Navigating life in a leg cast takes some practice, planning, and patience. These practical tips will help you get back to your normal life while you wait for the cast to come off.

What are some tips for getting around in a cast boot?

You can also use strategic thinking to make healing with a leg cast on less limiting.

  • Set up stations around your home. Group your medication, water, and snacks at various points around your house where you spend the most time. This can help limit the amount of time you have to move through your home and, potentially, moving up and down any stairs.
  • Clear the space through the main part of your home so you can move easily through it. Have a plan in case of emergency so you can quickly get out of your home if you need to.
  • Identify rest points at places you plan to visit. Call ahead to places you plan to go, like restaurants, museums, and hotels, to ask about disability access while wearing a cast boot. Remember that when you ask these kinds of questions, you aren’t just helping yourself – you’re advocating for other people, too.
  • If you work in a building with multiple floors or levels, let the doorman or manager of the building know that you’re on crutches or wearing a cast boot. If there’s a fire or other emergency in the building, someone needs to be alerted that there’s a person who can’t use the stairs and needs assistance.

While you might plan to walk a bit every day to promote circulation and prevent bone loss and muscle atrophy, walking will always present a challenge when you’re wearing a cast boot. Plan around your cast so you have assistance for the things you need to do standing up, such as getting dressed, going to appointments, showering, or bathing.

What are some tips for caring for your cast?

The material your cast is made of will impact the way you need to care for it. The two most common types of cast are plaster and synthetic, or fiberglass.

Plaster casts can’t get wet or the plaster will disintegrate. Fiberglass casts should be kept dry, but a small bit of moisture from sweat, rain, or stray shower droplets can be dried off with a paper towel.

Wear a cast boot to prevent the surface of your cast from getting too dirty. You can use a damp cloth to wipe dirt off your cast if it’s made of fiberglass.

What to know about cast and skin care when you walk?

Taking care of your cast, cast boot, and the skin beneath it is essential for proper healing of your leg injury.

If your cast makes your foot feel sweaty or itchy, resist the urge to stick something down into your cast. Your skin is fragile as it heals, and you may break your skin barrier by trying to itch or clean underneath the cast. Instead, consider dropping a small amount of baking soda between the cast and your skin to kill bacteria and keep the cast from smelling unpleasant.

Don’t stick toilet tissue or paper towels down into the cast. It could get trapped and reduce blood circulation, which you need to heal your wound.

Check the skin around your cast daily to make sure the cast isn’t too tight or too loose. If your skin becomes irritated or cracked around the site of your cast, speak to your doctor.

What is the benefit of walking with a cast boot?

Walking on your cast using a cast boot increases circulation to the area of your injury, which can promote healing of your broken bone. Walking on your cast also keeps you from losing bone mass. Even brief periods of walking while you’re in a cast can help prevent bone loss.

Every injury is different. Casts aim to immobilize your point of injury so your bone can fuse back together. A severe fibular fracture or trimalleolar fracture may require additional rest time before you should attempt walking, for instance. Your age, pain level, and risk of complications will shape your doctor’s advice about how soon you should try to walk on your cast.

What are some things to be aware of while in a cast?

Time spent in a cast can be frustrating, but most people don’t need to wear one for more than six weeks. Speak to your doctor if you notice any of the following symptoms:

  • your toes or lower leg appear to lose sensation or turn blue
  • you can’t wiggle your toes
  • swelling appears or becomes worse
  • your cast becomes loose
  • you have itching inside of your cast that won’t stop

After your cast comes off, be sure to perform any rehabilitation exercises, wear a walking cast or brace, and ask for any follow-up guidance from your doctor if you need it.

Source: (healthline.com)

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DARCO SlimLine Cast Boot cast boot, SlimLine, Darco, versatile
DARCO SlimLine Cast Boot – #1 Best Seller – HCPCS L3260
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HCPCS CODE L3260

MD Buying Group provides possible coding suggestions based on publicly-available information as a convenience to our customers. It is within the sole discretion of the customer to determine the appropriate billing code, as well as whether the use of a product complies with medical necessity standards and meets all documentation requirements of the payor. MD Buying Group accepts no responsibility whatsoever in this regard, nor does MDBG make claims, promises or guarantees as to the availability of reimbursement for any product.